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So I caved…

… and loved it! At our friends’ place the royal wedding was on and we watched it and just how much I’ve been following the royal wedding was revealed. Apparently no one else could name the wedding party, the duration of the service, how many receptions there would be, etc. In my defense, most of my info has come from Jezebel and The Hairpin who collate the royal wedding news so I just browse through it during my daily feminist readings.  Anyway here’s my wrap up:

I would totally fail at being a princess. I was much too excited at my wedding – bouncing up and down and smiling at Arthur. No demure glances for us! I wonder if it was hard for Kate and Will to be so toned down. Or maybe nerves helps? Or the pressure to behave?

So many moments of ‘yes, please God’ when they prayed for the royal couple to know and bring glory to God. One of the strengths of using the prayer book is that you have to include those bits, even if the royal couple look completely bored by them.

Now down to the details:

Kate’s dress:

  • Sarah Burton – of course! (even though she denied it when asked before the day)
  • more conservative than I’d thought
  • loved the lace
  • veil was gorgeous, so was the train
  • was there a problem with the bodice though? At first I thought she had nipple problems but then I think maybe the cups were too pointy? Maybe because she didn’t fill them out properly? It wasn’t all the time, just in certain light.
  • also, what’s with having such a tiny bouquet?

The wedding party:

  • Yes, so Will is balding, but we all knew that quite some time ago. Leave the poor guy alone, he can’t help it! On the other hand, the side part has to go.
  • Pippa Middleton – all class. And so elegant. She looked stunning.
  • Prince Harry – so much fun! So cute with the little flower girls and page boys. Also, he’s a tank. Has he bulked up or was it just his shoulder pads?

The royals:

  • I liked the few moments the Queen let herself go and actually looked excited after the ceremony. More of that please.
  • Still weirded out by Camilla being so accepted. And how she went in for the signing of the register like she was one of the parents.
  • Beatrice and Eugenie, oh dear. Poor things.

The religious types:

  • Rowan Williams – slightly crazed looking but what a star.
  • Bishop of London’s reference to the age of the spirit – is that big S or little s? Maybe more like the age of Aquarius? Still, loved the stuff about generous self-giving.
  • Anglican nuns – who knew? I liked that they actually looked like they were praying during the prayers.
  • What motivates men to go into all male choirs?

What did you think?

Categories: Culture Written by Tamie

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Tamie Davis

Tamie Davis is an Aussie living in Tanzania, writing at meetjesusatuni.com.

3 replies

  1. I liked it too Tamie, just the solemnity of it bothered me (as well as some other things… but you know about them ;-) ).
    Did you see when they were saying their vows their facial muscles twitching as they held back their beaming grins?! What’s with that! Marriage is something to be joyful about, no matter who you are!

    The people I watched it with, and myself, spent some time speculating about the level of involvement the couple had in actually planning their wedding… the ceremony itself seemed pretty impersonal to us. What do you think?

    I also disagree with the catchphrase about Kate’s dress, “traditional yet modern”. pretty traditional to me…
    :D

  2. Thanks for the wrap, Tamie! I missed most of it, because I was busy chatting with Lauren, but will probably watch it later, in iview.

    A word on solemnity – which I think evangelical Christians are bad at understanding, and dismissive of. There is a place and a time for it, and it’s a legitimate expression, and not just limited to princesses. Solemnity doesn’t mean that joy isn’t felt, and “there is a kind of happiness and wonder that makes you serious. It is too good to waste on jokes”. Marriage, as a picture of the Real marriage between Christ and the Church, with its weighty vows could be solemn – a holy promise, in which two enter, only by the grace of God (for how else can two sinful people expect to live together, till death?)

    (Altho’, it sounds a bit sad, from what I gather about Kate and Will, being forced to be solemn, when you just want to relax and grin!)

    There’s an argument made (quite nicely by CS Lewis) that in the frailty of a human royal family, we see the situation of the whole human race. They’re a symbol, but just because they’re a symbol, doesn’t mean they’re not important. Equally, the 19th century constitutionalist Walter Bagehot wrote that “A princely marriage is the brilliant edition of a universal fact, and as such rivets mankind.” and you can see that in the madness of the Brits over the wedding. it’s humanity in microcosm – the joy, the pomp, the solemnity, the excitement, and arguable, the consecration of secular life, splendor, ceremonial and continuity. Of course, the commercial element is ridiculous, but there’s something to be gathered here, and used for pointing people to Christ and the REAL marriage to come, and the fact that we are daughters and sons, princesses and princes, of the REAL King!

  3. I suspect the question about solemnity needs to be viewed in the context of their relationship thus far. Sure, they’ve decided to get married and that’s a big deal but I doubt they see marriage with the seriousness that we do. These are two people who’ve been living together before they actually got married and who are most likely not Christians. So I figure the solemnity comes from the pomp or the family pressure or tradition rather than from the knowledge that what they do they do in the sight of God.

    Ali, I reckon they had almost no input. They said that the songs were their favourites but I suspect what they meant was “favourites of the options we gave them” (none of which feature in their own top 10 list!). But then, looking at the emptiness of their prayer, maybe that was a good thing! ;)

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